The vocabulary’s development the collation of terms and expression is open, with no defined model of framework of what a smart Industry or Smart Industry EcoSystem or Industry 4.0 or however we name it may be. This is a deliberate choice to ensure a diverse collection of terms and expressions. The vocabulary’s working structure explains: Enabling concepts; Smart Industry systems; Resource management processes; Technology and infrastructure; Applications (output channels);

This structure, like the definitions, is open to change and expand in the future, but is sufficiently broad to capture the first collation rounds.

 

IoT

IoT is short for Internet of Things. The Internet of Things refers to the ever-growing network of physical objects that feature an IP address for internet connectivity, and the communication that occurs between these objects and other internet-enabled devices and systems. Your Wi-fi doorbell, or smart refrigerator are everyday examples of IoT devices.

 

IIoT

Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is a subset of IoT, aimed specifically at industrial applications. IIoT is about connecting machines to other machines/data management and the optimization and productivity that is possible to make “smart factories.”

 

Industry 4.0

This is a phrase coined in Europe. It means the same as IIoT and refers to the fourth industrial revolution, as depicted in the title image. The term is interchangeable with IIoT and is now recognized globally.

 

Industry 4.0: Sub Components

To take full advantage of IoT, IIoT, and Industry 4.0 benefits, there are several components that must first be understood. Let’s look at each of these in more detail.

 

1. The Cloud

Utilizing the intranet to access data at any location where internet connectivity is possible, the cloud is an IT paradigm. Moving from conventional servers to the cloud empowers the availability of data wherever and whenever needed. Furthermore, the cloud enables companies to focus on their core expertise rather than investing large sums of money on computer infrastructure and maintenance. Cloud computing relies on the sharing of resources to achieve economies of scale, like a public utility.

 

2. Sensors And Connected Devices

Just about every product bought today is equipped with an IP address. Those who use Nest at home, view home cameras from a mobile phone, or start a car from an app are all using IOT. IIOT provides the same capabilities, but for larger pieces of equipment. This typically requires integration into corporate software like Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP), Product Lifecycle Management (PLM), or asset management software. In some cases the equipment is older and might not have internet connectivity; thankfully, there are numerous sensors available on the market for making old equipment compatible.

 

3. Augmented Reality

Data is available almost everywhere, which also increases our urge to be able to view it almost anywhere. Providing data with context almost immediately makes it more meaningful. This is where augmented reality (AR) comes in, and it can be implemented in many variants:

  • Phone/Tablet: When you hold up your device to view a piece of equipment, a digital overlay can provide additional data regarding that equipment, KPI’s, Graphical Data, Schematics, Graphical Data, and Digital twin data, among others.
  • Assisted Reality Wearable: Like Google Glass, this displays an image of computer screen typically to one eye, providing on-the-spot data.
  • Immersive Augmented Reality Wearable: Typically, this involves glasses that attempt to cover your most of your viewing field, with the potential to show KPI’s, graphical data, schematics, and digital twin data, among other functionality.

It doesn’t take much to notice that phone, tablet, and immersive AR wearables share many of the same display opportunities. Phones and tablets are excellent in many use cases, but the distinguishing factor comes in when you need to perform work at the point-of-use. In these cases, wearable devices are easier to utilize.

 

4. Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the phenomenon of computer and machine learning. Devices are now available that recognize their environment and begin to take actions based on that environment to maximize achieving a goal or a result.  AI is also now being used to recognize and separate parts (sorting good from bad parts). We have seen it in the food industry for years, but it is now capable of sorting parts by size or in so cases a good part vs a bad part.

 

5. Big Data

Big data refers to data sets that are so big and complex even traditional data-processing application software are inadequate to deal with them. Big data challenges include capturing data, data storage, data analysis, search, sharing, transfer, visualization, querying, updating, information privacy, and data source.

 

6. Digital Twin

Digital twin is a digital representation of a physical asset. Digital twins can be used to show how an item is serviced. This can also be used in combination with AI tool sets, software analytics, and real-world data to create living digital simulation models that update and change along with their physical counterparts.

 

7. Cybersecurity

The increased demand for cloud and internet-based services increases the need for protection of computer systems from theft of or damage to their hardware, software or electronic data, as well as from disruption or misdirection of the services they provide. Cyber security includes controlling physical access to system hardware, as well as protecting against harm that may be done via network access, malicious data and code injection.

 

8. Additive Manufacturing and Digital Scanning

The significant price reduction of digital scanners and 3D printers enables much faster prototyping of products/product development. A few large companies are now looking to use 3D printing in production, allowing more complex parts to be made in significantly less time.

 

Immediate Benefits Of Industry 4.0 

With a basic understanding of the technologies that combine to create Industry 4.0, let’s look at some examples of how it can help the manufacturing environment.

 

Autonomous system

System capable of functioning on its own, without human intervention or direction

 

Big data

High volume, high velocity, and or high variety of information assets that require new forms of processing to enable enhanced decision making, insight discovery and process optimization

 

Cloud computing

Scalable IT services accessible via the internet for a Potentially large number of external customers, providing facilities for the storing and use of data and information on facilities remote from local computing facilities

 

Cyber security

Mechanisms and processes put in place to ensure the integrity of operation of computer systems, protecting their operations against malicious or unintentional intervention. Examples of malicious or unintentional intervention include eaves- dropping, trojans, viruses and worms, phishing, denial of service, rootkits and keyloggers.

 

Data centre

Dedicated space where  infrastructure is hosted and operated on behalf of one or a number of organizations

 

Encryption

Function of transforming data by the discipline of cryptography so as to make the data undecipherable to anyone other than the legitimate sender and receiver. As used in a network security context, encryption is usually accom- plished by putting the data through any of several established mathematical a lgorithms developed specifically to this purpose.

 

Integrated

Combined and compatible operation of different Industry Ecosystems and exchange of data and information with the aim of achieving more effective outcomes with least resource input. Such Industry Ecosystems prodution effectivness, energy effeciency, factories performace, employment services, etc.

 

Integrity

Property that information is not altered in any way, deliberately or accidentally

 

Interoperability

Ability of systems to provide services to and accept services from other systems and to use the services so exchanged to enable them to operate effectively together Internet of things (IoT) State where things (e.g. objects, factories, …… ) have more and more information associated with them and may have the ability to sense, communicate, network and produce new information, becoming an integral part of the internet

 

Management information system

Information processing system that supports the decision-making of a community city or organization

 

Open platform

Software system based on open standards.

For example, published and documented external application programming interfaces (API) that allow the software system to function beyond the Scope of the original programmer’s specification, without requiring modification of the source code. Using these interfaces, third parties can integrate with the platform to add functionality.

 

Open standard

Standards for software interoperability, data and document formats.

According rules and criterias an open standard will exhibit all ofthe following criteria:

  1. Collaboration – the standard is maintained through a collaborative decision-making process that is consensus based and independent of any individual supplier;
  2. Transparency – the standard has a transparent decision-making process;
  3. Due process – the standard is adopted by a specification or standardisation organization, or a forum or consortium with a feedback and ratification process to ensure quality;
  4. Market support – other than in the context of creating innovative solutions, the standard is mature, supported by the market and demonstrates platform, application and vendor independence;
  5. Fair access – the standard is published, thoroughly documented and publicly available at zero or low cost;
  6. Rights – rights essential to implementation of the standard, and for inter facing with other implementations which have adopted that same standard, are licensed on a royalty free basis that is compatible with both open source and proprietary licences

Scalability

Scalability is one of those topics that comes up a lot. We talk about it with customers, prospects, analysts and the media as one of the key differentiators of our product and why companies should look at us.

We’ve even done reports and benchmark tests to validate the scalability of our product (we are incredibly proud of the results).

In all of this conversations, one thing is very clear – scalability means a lot of different things to a lot of different people.

It also becomes increasingly clear that it can be so hard to achieve, especially in the Internet of Things.

Administration shell

A popular rising Industry 4.0 term, an administrative shell describes the process of automating generic admin tasks. (Related terms: administration system)

 

Automation

When used to refer to Industry 4.0, automation describes the utilization of digital systems to control equipment and machinery.

 

Cloud computing

We all know what the cloud is, but how does it relate to Industry 4.0? In regard to Industry 4.0, cloud computing will play a central role in where–and how–data will be stored.

 

Cloud robotics

As we mentioned under cloud computing, communication between the physical and digital worlds will be controlled in the cloud. And with cloud robotics, communication can be more easily managed between robots used in mobile applications. (Related term: robofactory)

 

Cyber physical production systems

In a cyber physical system, also known as a CPS, physical and digital entities are connected, monitored and managed with computer programming and algorithms. (Related term: CPS platform)

 

Cyber world

This term is exactly what it sounds like: the ‘world’ in which computer communication takes place. (Related term: information world)

 

Data ownership

The meaning of this term is easy to guess, as data ownership refers to the legal ownership of data. Expect to hear more about data ownership as leaders and stakeholders begin utilizing and analyzing the data delivered by Industry 4.0 processes.

 

Digital footprint

Whenever you use the Internet, or even your cell phone, a digital footprint is the mark you leave behind. We’ve mentioned before that Industry 4.0 opens the door to new vulnerabilities, and managing and securing digital footprints will be one area of focus for many IT leaders. (Related terms: digital shadow, digital risk)

 

Digital supply chain

A digital supply chain is an environment in which processes are web-based. If organizations want to successfully implement Industry 4.0 ideals, they will need to integrate a digital supply chain into their processes.

 

Edge gateway

An edge gateway serves as a network entry point for devices typically talking to cloud services.  They also often provide network translation between networks that use different protocols. (Related term: entry device)

 

Fog computing

This term refers to extending cloud computing to the edge of an enterprise’s network. It brings the advantages and power of cloud computing closer to where the data is being generated and acted upon.  It can reduce the amount of data that is transferred to the cloud for processing and analysis, while also improving security.(Related terms: fog networking, fogging)

 

OEE

The acronym OEE, which stands for overall equipment effectiveness, refers to the evaluation of how effectively equipment is working in a manufacturing environment.

 

OPC UA

OPC UA, or OPC Unified Architecture, was developed by the OPC Foundation, an industry consortium focused on automation.

OPC UA refers to machine the standards set for automation and communication between machines.

 

Open data

Another term that you’ve heard before, open data is data that is available for public use without restrictions. Data, particularly smart data, is a driving force behind Industry 4.0, and you can expect to hear more about open data in the days to come.

 

Predictive maintenance

One of the greatest draws of Industry 4.0 is the ability it gives to predicting productivity and maintenance needs of machines. Predictive maintenance is the term used to describe this approach.

 

Provisioning

This term refers to the process of enrolling, or implementing, a device into a system.

 

SCADA

SCADA, or supervisory control and data acquisition, refers to a control system in which peripheral devices are used to interface, in addition to computers and other networks.

 

Smart manufacturing

Smart manufacturing is used to describe an environment in which computers are in charge of decision-making. In a smart manufacturing environment, physical and digital are connected and communicate with one another to improve production. (Related terms: smart factory, smart production, smart data)

 

Value-added

One of the most popular words to describe the potential outcomes of Industry 4.0, value-added refers to the savings these integrated processes are expected to bring. (Related terms: value-added system, value-added chain, value-added process)

API
API is the acronym for Application Programming Interface, which is a software intermediary that allows two applications to talk to each other. Each time you use an app like Facebook, send an instant message, or check the weather on your phone, you’re using an API. An application-programming interface (API) is a set of programming instructions and standards for accessing a Web-based software application or Web tool. An API (Application Programming Interface) is a set of functions that allows applications to access data and interact with external software components, operating systems, or microservices. … API lets a developer make a specific “call” or “request” in order to send or receive information.

Scalability
Scalability is one of those topics that comes up a lot. We talk about it with customers, prospects, analysts and the media as one of the key differentiators of our product and why companies should look at us. We’ve even done reports and benchmark tests to validate the scalability of our product (we are incredibly proud of the results). In all of this conversations, one thing is very clear – scalability means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. It also becomes increasingly clear that it can be so hard to achieve, especially in the Internet of Things.

Administration shell
A popular rising Industry 4.0 term, an administrative shell describes the process of automating generic admin tasks. (Related terms: administration system).

Automation
When used to refer to Industry 4.0, automation describes the utilization of digital systems to control equipment and machinery.

Cloud computing
We all know what the cloud is, but how does it relate to Industry 4.0? In regard to Industry 4.0, cloud computing will play a central role in where–and how–data will be stored.

Cloud robotics
As we mentioned under cloud computing, communication between the physical and digital worlds will be controlled in the cloud. And with cloud robotics, communication can be more easily managed between robots used in mobile applications. (Related term: robofactory)

Cyber physical production systems
In a cyber physical system, also known as a CPS, physical and digital entities are connected, monitored and managed with computer programming and algorithms. (Related term: CPS platform)

Cyber world
This term is exactly what it sounds like: the ‘world’ in which computer communication takes place. (Related term: information world)

Data ownership
The meaning of this term is easy to guess, as data ownership refers to the legal ownership of data. Expect to hear more about data ownership as leaders and stakeholders begin utilizing and analyzing the data delivered by Industry 4.0 processes.

Digital footprint
Whenever you use the Internet, or even your cell phone, a digital footprint is the mark you leave behind. We’ve mentioned before that Industry 4.0 opens the door to new vulnerabilities, and managing and securing digital footprints will be one area of focus for many IT leaders. (Related terms: digital shadow, digital risk)

Digital supply chain
A digital supply chain is an environment in which processes are web-based. If organizations want to successfully implement Industry 4.0 ideals, they will need to integrate a digital supply chain into their processes.

Edge gateway
An edge gateway serves as a network entry point for devices typically talking to cloud services.  They also often provide network translation between networks that use different protocols. (Related term: entry device)

Fog computing
This term refers to extending cloud computing to the edge of an enterprise’s network. It brings the advantages and power of cloud computing closer to where the data is being generated and acted upon.  It can reduce the amount of data that is transferred to the cloud for processing and analysis, while also improving security.(Related terms: fog networking, fogging)

OEE
The acronym OEE, which stands for overall equipment effectiveness, refers to the evaluation of how effectively equipment is working in a manufacturing environment.

OPC UA
OPC UA, or OPC Unified Architecture, was developed by the OPC Foundation, an industry consortium focused on automation. OPC UA refers to machine the standards set for automation and communication between machines.

Open data
Another term that you’ve heard before, open data is data that is available for public use without restrictions. Data, particularly smart data, is a driving force behind Industry 4.0, and you can expect to hear more about open data in the days to come.

Predictive maintenance
One of the greatest draws of Industry 4.0 is the ability it gives to predicting productivity and maintenance needs of machines. Predictive maintenance is the term used to describe this approach.

Provisioning
This term refers to the process of enrolling, or implementing, a device into a system.

SCADA
SCADA, or supervisory control and data acquisition, refers to a control system in which peripheral devices are used to interface, in addition to computers and other networks.

Smart manufacturing
Smart manufacturing is used to describe an environment in which computers are in charge of decision-making. In a smart manufacturing environment, physical and digital are connected and communicate with one another to improve production. (Related terms: smart factory, smart production, smart data)

Value-added
One of the most popular words to describe the potential outcomes of Industry 4.0, value-added refers to the savings these integrated processes are expected to bring. (Related terms: value-added system, value-added chain, value-added process)

Hackathon
Hackathon (sometimes a combination of the words hack and marathon), sometimes referred to as codefest, is one one-day workshop in which IT specialists work intensively on a number of projects and projects.
It therefore has a predetermined goal and ends with some “tangible” output, respectively. component. It is typically programmed in a relaxed atmosphere in the same teams.